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Andrew Carnegie

The Carnegie Institution for Science is a private organization that conducts basic research for the benefit of humanity.

Other News

— Read the LA Times featuring Ken Caldeira's study about beef and climate change more »

Watch Ken Caldeira address climate change on Fox News. more »

Forbes discusses the letter Ken Caldeira and others wrote embracing nuclear energy to help combat global warming. more »

Times-Herald Interview with Greg Asner About the Ecological Crisis in the Amazon. more »

National Geographic quotes Greg Asner about gold mining in Peru 10-28-13 more »

Luis Fernandez's work on mercury pollution in Peru is covered by the Huffington Post. more »

 

Recent News

Perú’s Carbon Quantified: Economic and Conservation Boon

Scientists unveiled the first high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on land throughout the entire country of Perú. The new and improved methodology used to make the map marks a sea change for future market-based carbon economies. The new carbon map also reveals Perú’s extremely high ecological diversity and it provides the critical input to studies of deforestation and forest degradation for conservation, land use, and enforcement purposes. The technique includes the determination of uncertainty of carbon stores throughout the country, which is essential for decision makers. The mapping project is a joint effort among the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO), led by DGE’s Greg Asner, the Ministry of Environment of Perú, and Wake Forest University. more »

Climate warming may not drive net losses of soil carbon from tropical forests

The planet’s soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels. This happens through a process called soil respiration. This enormous release of carbon is balanced by carbon coming into the soil system from falling leaves and other plant matter, as well as by the underground activities of plant roots. Short-term warming studies have documented that rising temperatures increase the rate of soil respiration. As a result, scientists have worried that global warming would accelerate the decomposition of carbon in the soil, and decrease the amount of carbon stored there. If true, this would release even more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, where it would accelerate global warming. New work by a team of scientists including Greg Asner and Christian Giardina of the U.S. Forest Service used an expansive whole-ecosystem study, the first of its kind, on tropical montane wet forests in Hawaii to sort through the many processes that control soil carbon stocks with changing temperature. Their findings are published by Nature Climate Change. more »

Climate: Meat turns up the heat

Eating meat contributes to climate change, due to greenhouse gasses emitted by livestock. New research by Dario Caro, formerly of Carnegie and now at the University of Siena in Italy, and DGE’s Ken Caldeira, finds that livestock emissions are on the rise and that beef cattle are responsible for far more greenhouse gas emissions than other types of animals. It is published by Climatic Change. Carbon dioxide is the most-prevalent gas when it comes to climate change. It is released by vehicles, industry, and forest removal and comprises the greatest portion of greenhouse gas totals. But methane and nitrous oxide are also greenhouse gasses and account for approximately 28 percent of global warming activity. more »